Living With Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO)

Meet Donna, who explains her experience with RVO treatments and anti-VEGF injections for RVO

Symptoms may include:1, 2

RVO patients most commonly have painless vision loss, distorted vision or floaters. Although the majority of RVO occurs in one eye, 5%-6% of branch retinal vein occlusions (BRVO) and 10% of central retinal vein occlusions (CRVO) affects both eyes. 3, 4 Some RVO patients will need treatment while others will only need to be monitored.6 Your eye doctor will closely monitor you for macular edema (fluid buildup and swelling of the center part of the retina) and glaucoma (increased eye pressure from fluid buildup)7, 9. As part of the team approach to maintaining vision, your primary care and eye physicians will communicate with each other. Getting a complete physical and bloodwork with your primary care provider can help detect any risk factors.1 Healthy lifestyle changes, including regular exercise, smoking cessation, low-fat diet, and maintaining an ideal weight can also be protective.2

References

  1. Flaxel CJ, Adelman RA, Bailey ST, et al. Retinal Vein Occlusion Preferred Practice Pattern®. Ophthalmology. 2020;127:P288-P320.
  2. Buehl W, Sacu S, Schmidt-Erfurth U. Retinal Vein Occlusions. Dev Ophthalmol. 2010;46:54-72.
  3. Rogers SL, McIntosh RL, Lim L, et al. Natural history of branch retinal vein occlusion: an evidence-based systematic review. Ophthalmology. 2010;117:1094-1101.e5.
  4. Ford JA, Clar C, Lois N, et al. Treatments for macular oedema following central retinal vein occlusion: systematic review. BMJ Open. 2014;4:e004120.
  5. Rehak J, Rehak M. Branch retinal vein occlusion: Pathogenesis visual prognosis and treatment modality. CurrEye Res 2008;33:111-131. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18293182/.
  6. WillsEye Hospital. Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). https://www.willseye.org/central-retinal-vein-occlusion-crvo/.
  7. American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS). Branch retinal vein occlusion. 2020. https://www.asrs.org/patients/retinal-diseases/24/branch-retinal-vein-occlusion.
  8. Morris R, Retinal vein occlusion. Kerala J Ophthalmol. 2016;28:4-13.
  9. ASRS. Glossary. https://www.asrs.org/patients/retinal-diseases/10/glossary/#Glaucoma.

All URLs accessed 3/1/2022.

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Patient & Caregiver Educational Resources

The RELIEF Patient Toolkit is a resource center for patients who have been diagnosed with or who are interested in learning about Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO). Choose from the options below to learn more.

This activity is provided by Med Learning Group. This activity is co-provided by Ultimate Medical Academy/CCM.
This activity is supported by an educational grant from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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Scientific Council

Neil M. Bressler, MD

James P. Gills Professor of Ophthalmology
Professor of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Medicine
Baltimore, MD

A. Paul Chous, MA, OD, FAAO

Specializing in Diabetes Eye Care & Education, Chous Eye Care Associates
Adjunct Professor of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences
AOA Representative, National Diabetes Education Program
Tacoma, WA

Steven Ferrucci, OD, FAAO

Chief of Optometry, Sepulveda VA Medical Center
Professor, Southern California College of Optometry at Marshall B. Ketchum University
Sepulveda, CA

Julia A. Haller, MD

Ophthalmologist-in-Chief
Wills Eye Hospital
Philadelphia, PA

Allen C. Ho, MD, FACS

Director, Retina Research
Wills Eye Hospital
Professor and Chair of the Department of Ophthalmology
Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals
Philadelphia, PA

Charles C. Wykoff, MD, PhD

Director of Research, Retina Consultants of Houston
Associate Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology
Blanton Eye Institute & Houston Methodist Hospital
Houston, TX